..
 
Welcome to Barker's Nook and Chihuahua Nook
 
   
   
   
   

DOGS AND CATS

Introducing Canine to Feline.

 

The relationship between cats and dogs is one of legendary status. Natural, sworn enemies of the animal kingdom. The lumbering dog and the fleet of foot cat have been at each others throats for generations. But does it have to be this way?

In short, yes. Cartoon makers would be out of business and the world would probably come to a grinding halt if cats and dogs actually decided to call a truce. We as humans do have the ability to act a mediators between the warring factions and in some cases, we can get the two species to co-habit with no problems.

When a cat and dog have grown up together, either when the kitten was introduced or the puppy, there is normally a healthy relationship built up over the course of time. In a lot of cases cats and dogs actually do get along and even 'LIKE' each other. Problems tend to arrive when adults of either species are suddenly introduced to an established household (and pecking order). This situation may arise because someone has asked you to look after their pet for a short while or you may have been kind enough to adopt an adult cat or dog from a rescue Centre.  

Upon introduction of a new four legged creature to the home, established members may become jealous, defensive, aggressive, withdrawn, protective, possessive or all of these things. Dogs tend to react worse to the introduction of a cat than vice-versa. Dogs have a natural place within a pack and new animal will be seen as threat to that position. Cats tend to deal with the meeting of a dog with distain and often come across as un-interested. This fine. It is when there is a clear animosity between the two that problems occur.

Dogs instinctively chase other animals that move or run suddenly. Cats do not particularly enjoy being chased by other animals and thus friction occurs. Training your dog not to chase the cat is a must. It is essential that you correct your dog for chasing while at the same time, you must ensure that you do not build up a will inside the dog to chase when you are not there. In many cases chasing behaviour is more of a problem in dogs that have NEVER been allowed to chase. Take for instance, two identical puppies are born. One is sent to live with an owner who lives in a small flat, in the middle of a busy city. Contact with other animals in nil. This dog, on a walk to a park, sees a cat for the first time in his life, slips the lead and begins the chase. This is dog instinct in action. The dog has no reason to chase the cat but animal instinct dictates that he should. The other puppy meanwhile, was sent to live on a huge farm surrounded by ducks, livestock, chickens and other farmyard animals. He is allowed to roam free on the farm from a young age and is never prevented from chasing anything. As a youngster this dogs instincts are just the same as the other dogs. He chases all the animals but achieves no success in catching any. The chasing soon becomes futile and his other canine strength kicks in, intelligence. This dog neither has the will or ambition to chase. He's got it out of system and prefers instead to just watch the other animals and learns to live with them side by side.

This story illustrates that it is very often better to let two animals 'sort themselves'. They will establish a relationship, be it love, hat or just tolerance. By interfering continually, many owners can cause friction because of the restrictions placed on the dog. After all, he will wonder what it is that must be so good, that you are bending over backward stop him doing. 

Be observant. Be vigilant. Make sure early contact is supervised. Make sure feeding is supervised. But make sure you don't upset the natural relationship that will develop between the two animals.

----- 

CATS NUTRITION AND ADVICE.

All cats, despite thousands of years of domestication, remain strictly carnivorous, and require a meat diet. They are incapable of digesting and getting nutrition from the majority of vegetable proteins. There can be no vegetarian cats. In the wild they eat all of their prey: organs bones etc. They get nutrition from various vegetable sources, thanks to the preys digestive  processes. An ideal diet would be one which meets these needs. A wild diet, with mouse, sparrow, insects etc.

It seems unlikely commercial companies will ever produce these though. Some cats have special dietary needs i.e. kittens, pregnant, nursing, and elderly cats. Some feed is processed to suit these needs. The majority of us will be feeding  our cats commercial foods. These scientifically-balanced foods usually contain supplements and additives to guarantee the best nutritional balance possible. DRY foods are cheapest, andalso their abrasive action helps keep teeth and gums healthy. They can be left out at all times, so the cat has many small meals, thus improving tone and digestion. One possible disadvantage is Feline Urological Syndrome (FUS). The dry dog foods low water content, may contribute to the problem, if a male cat is FUS predisposed.  SOFT-MOIST foods have more appeal, and cost more.They can not be left out as long. However most of these types of food contain preservatives. CANNED foods are the most expensive. They do nothing to help inhibit dental tartar. However they do lack a predisposition towards thedevelopment of  FUS. If a cat has suffered with FUS, a low magnesium diet is prescribed by the Vet. GOURMET foods are usually not balanced,and must not be given as the basis of your cats diet. Think of them as treat foods. MILK is a food, not a drink. The only cat drink is water. It provides  the calcium andphosphorus, needed for strong bones and teeth, and many other vitamins and minerals. Unfortunately lots of cats lose the ability to digest milk as they age. 

----- 

WHEN TO CALL THE VET.

IF YOUR PET SHOWS ANY OF THE FOLLOWING SIGNS: 

Abnormal discharge from the nose, eyes  or other body openings. Loss of appetite, weight gain or loss, excessive water consumption, difficult or abnormal urine or waste elimination. Abnormal lumps, limping or difficulty getting up or lying down. Excessive head shaking, scratching, and licking, or biting any part of the body. Foul breath or excessive tartar deposit  on teeth. Dandruff, loss of hair, open sores or a ragged or dull coat.

IF YOU HAVE ANY DOUBT AS TO YOUR PETS HEALTH, IT IS MOST ESSENTIAL THAT YOU CHECK WITH YOUR VET. YOU SHOULD NEVER LEAVE ANY PROBLEMS UNATTENDED. QUICK ACTION, AND EARLY DIAGNOSIS MAY SAVE THE LIFE OF YOUR PET.

Copyright ©  2002 - 2010 G.Double.  All rights reserved.
www.barkersnook.com

 

..

 

If you can't see the menu on this page, please click here to refresh
.